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The End of An Era

I am bereft, friends. Despondent. Saddened. Heart-heavy. The filagreed beauties you see before you were, until yesterday morning, my second set of eyes for the past 12 years. Furthermore, there were an heirloom, belonging to my great-grandmother, Lena May Law. After letting the chickens out early yesterday morning, I returned to the house with the dogs, all set to feed my five hungry, heavily vocal cats. As I was removing my eyeglasses, the left side remained stubbornly stuck behind my left ear. I tugged on it with one hand (a colossally bad decision in hindsight, which, unlike me, is 20-20), and saw the middle begin to bend. In a panic, I lifted them off with two hands and watched them gently break in two. 


A trip to a nearby optometrist today informs me they are beyond repair. Once the mold is broken, they apparently cannot be mended. I know I shouldn’t be so attached to my glasses. I know that, but I don’t feel that. Maw-Maw, as she was known to me, experienced her quiet life behind those frames, as did I. I even have a picture of her wearing them when I was just a baby, along with my mother and grandmother in the photo. Sure, I’ll find other vintage cat-eye glasses. It’s become my look, after all, one which I’ve curated and like. They won’t be hers, though, making the past the present every time I fit them behind my ears and over the bridge of my nose. 

In the meantime, I’m looking through a lens darkly. Literally. Owning no spare pair (I know, again, another colossally bad decision), I’ve been relying on my sunglasses. Fortunately, my specs are for distances, so, as long as it’s daylight while I’m driving or I’m sitting really close to the television, everything is fine. I’ll get a quick-fix pair soon (tomorrow?) and begin the vintage hunt. If you have a good source, I’m all ears (eyes?). RIP Maw-Maw specs. You provided clarity unrivaled. 

*Specs update: It’s entirely possible that all hope may not yet be lost. My sweet hubs found a website for vintage eyeglass repair. Cornell, at Frame Fixers, assured me this morning that my glasses can be repaired. Glenn is taking them to the post office today to be sent Priority Mail to upstate NY. Cornell is one of only two persons left in the entire U.S. with the know-how and equipment needed to repair glasses such as mine. Here’s to hoping it works! I’ll keep you updated as further reports come in…

15 Responses to The End of An Era

  • Denise says:

    I hope you can crazy glue them back together just to look at especially since they belonged to your gramma. So sad…

  • Emily says:

    Nooooo! That is terrible news. I know you aren't a 'material girl' but those frames weren't just stuff… they were part of your self image as well as your external image, they were an heirloom, they were treasured memories. I’m saddened by your loss but I guess change is a natural and healthy thing (albeit uncomfortable).

    Here's a toast to the new! And my wish for you: I hope that an item with as much meaning as those frames enters your life soon to replace the void. In the meantime, maybe you should have your broken frames placed into a small shadow box and hung on the wall where they can be appreciated there instead. – Emily

  • Bailey B says:

    duct tape! it fixes everything & the taped up glasses look is totally nerd-a-licious! so sorry ash. i miss your and your glasses.

  • Anonymous says:

    It's been years since I was there, but Stefan's in Little Five Points in Atlanta had some great vintage glasses, with good prices.

  • nicole says:

    I actually gasped when I read that. I know how very much those glasses meant to you. They were far more than a mere accessory (although they were fabulous), they were a reminder of where you came from. It's actually pretty hard to imagine you without them. For quick replacement, perhaps a perusal of eBay might result in something affordable and charming that you could get shipped to you quick. Other than that, I've seen some lovely frames at that place downtown, albeit a bit pricey. I'd be happy to go look with you sometime soon. Hugs!

  • Jill Benbow says:

    Although it is undoubtedly an irreplaceable loss, I think you will soon find your Maw-Maw is with you always- regardless of the glasses on your face. Still, we all feel your pain and wish you well! Best wishes with your replacement pair- although I'd get a second opinion about the feasibility of repairing the pair in question from someone in the glasses and/or artsy world if I were you :) xoxo- Jill

  • It's funny I thought those were new glasses they looked so in style. I'm sure your great grandmother would have been so proud of you wearing them. To think they lasted that long!
    vickie

  • Hybrid Hopes says:

    maybe you could frame them. with some other things.

    sorry :/

  • Bailey B says:

    http://www.etsy.com/shop.php?user_id=7199276
    check out this etsy seller: Vintage50sEyeware.

  • Anonymous says:

    So sad. I don't think I will recognize you…

  • keri says:

    Oh, no! What dreadful news! It is, however, an excellent excuse for spending money on bang-up new glasses to speed your emotional healing.

  • annie b. says:

    Fabulous Fanny's, 9th Street & 1st or 2nd Avenue. New York. Go. Now.
    (The website, http://store.fabulousfannys.com/catalog, doesn't do them justice.)

  • Anonymous says:

    YEA! I AM SO GLAD! GLENN TO THE RESCUE!!!!! EVEN IF YOU ARE MY DAUGHTER I DO NOT KNOW IF I COULD IMAGINE YOU WITHOUT THEM!THEY HAVE BECOME A PART IF YOU GIRLFRIEND!!!

    LUVIN'S MOM

  • Jenna says:

    I hope you get them repaired, they are awesome.

  • Jen Chandler says:

    Good luck with getting those fixed! Nothing's worse than breaking something that means something too you and hearing it cannot be repaired.

    Jen