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QUENCH

 

HANDMADE GATHERINGS

 

A YEAR OF PIES!

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: HOME DAIRY

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: KEEPING BEES

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: CANNING & PRESERVING

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: KEEPING CHICKENS


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  • When @bakerhands put out a call two days ago asking for a few hours of baking help today, I pounced at the chance to spend some quality time with such a warm, wise lady. When I found out @rorris and @jenathan had offered the same thing, the deal became even sweeter. The four of us gathered at Smoke Signals Bakery in Marshall today to chat, chew, and chop. Three cheers for wonderful people, delicious food, and fostering community. Hip, hip, freaking HOORAY!!! What a stellar day. *I was in charge of apple pie filling prep today. Photo credit to @rorris for capturing my hella serious pie-making game face!!!
  • When your morning looks like this, you know you're off to a good start. Was introduced to the glorious donuts and conviviality at @holedoughnuts today. Mercy! Goodness abounds.
  • Finally, I bring you this
  • This next pie is a pumpkin-meets-tiramisu hybrid, my
  • Up next in pie recipes with a Thanksgiving vibe from my book
  • Trying to decide what desserts to make for Thanksgiving (we're hosting a big potluck,
  • Totally a long underwear, trains in front of the wood stove kind of evening. Stay warm out there, friends! Low of 15 here tonight, BRR!!!!
  • Very fun to find this spread in the @womansworkco catalogue that arrived with yesterday's mail. Thank to so very much, Dorian, for all of your support. I ADORE my @womansworkco gloves. Friends, if you're shopping for durable, beautiful gloves made in the U.S., look no further. I wear my @womansworkco gloves out to the chicken coop every morning and can't recommend them enough! Also, there's a giveaway of three autographed copies of my book
  • Romanesco as meditative object. These served as the gorgeous centerpiece on our table at last night's @rhubarbavl 1-year anniversary dinner. Stunning.
  • Still thinking about last noght's sensational @rhubarbavl 1-year anniversary dinner. We adore the restaurant and chef John Fleer's elegant yet approachable southern Appalachian cuisine. Last night's Sunday Supper featured @bentonsbacon, @cruzefarmgirl, and Jolley Farm. It was a meal I won't soon forget, especially on account of these @sunbursttrout filets wrapped in @bentonsbacon served atop brown butter braised Savoy cabbage (that cabbage changed my life, no joke!). Job well done, @rhubarbavl!
  • At long last, Huxley finally found a dancing partner last night downtown in Asheville.
  • Perfect Saturday for this transcendent hot chocolate, made from scratch with @frenchbroadchocolates bars, sweetened with handcrafted sorghum syrup, and garnished with a dollop of homemade apple butter, graham cracker chards, slivered almonds, apple slices, cinnamon, and fresh ground nutmeg. Bring it, cold weather!
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The Elusive Berry


Turns out we have wineberries. In abundance! I had never even heard of wineberries (turns out spellcheck hasn’t heard of wineberries either, as every time I type the word, I am offered “winterize” or “wineries” instead), let alone sampled one. Glenn didn’t know about the wineberry profusion either. Apparently, mistaking the bramble-y sprout for an invasive (turns out, it sort of is…more on that later), he had triumphantly cut it back each season, subsequently curtailing any berry profusion lying in wait.

This past Spring, though, we decided to have a Permaculture appraisal done of our property. We did this with the hope of assessing ways in which we might optimize our land (which includes 12 rural acres outside of Asheville, N.C.), while treading lightly on it. Our Permaculture specialist, Chuck, pointed out the fledging wineberries on the property tour, immediately identifying them. Since we’d not yet encountered said berries, we were somewhat suspect, but held out hope considering that Chuck is the expert and we’ve been trigger happy with the pruning shears.

Remember the “patience” phrase from last entry? The
ever-so-slightly-creepy-yet-totally-beneficial-as-an-adult (sorry mom, but it’s true) saying my mom had my brother and I recite often? The wineberries are a perfect example of that. Taking Chuck at his word, we curbed the urge to prune, and sure enough, last month, we got wineberries.

Rubus Phoenicolasius is a species of the genus Rubus, which also includes blackberries and raspberries. Native to Japan, China and Korea, wineberries are a classic example of one man’s flower being another man’s weed. Considered an invasive on account of its nature to form dense thickets over large areas, choking out and displacing native plants in the process, horticultural types find wineberries to be a pest. I personally find them to be delicious. Often mistaken for raspberries, wineberries are darker in color when fully ripe and pack a wallop of sour barely hinted at in raspberries.


Fortunately, on my property, the wineberries have concentrated themselves in a contained area, rubbing elbows comfortably with a patch of assorted ferns. Fortunately for my chickens, the thicket lies en route to the chicken coop and the past few weeks have found a handful of just-picked wineberries in their morning meal. This is cause for much squawking and rushing to be first at the berries. Uno, thusly named owing to her insistence at having first dibs at mealtime, raises her squawk pitch several decibel levels when the berries are presented. I’m pretty certain I received a “beak lashing” (I
cannot get enough lame chicken humor!) one morning last week when I showed up with only the feed, no berries to offer. Uno would have none of that, and, whipped owner that I am, I managed to scrounge around in another thicket, risking close encounters of the reptilian kind (snakes-totally deserving of boldface and italics-love berries and wait beneath the canes waiting for over-ripe berries to drop) to procure the coveted berries.

Wineberries are also apparently a hit at dinner parties. We brought a pint of them, along with a bottle of wine, to dinner at a friend’s house recently. The berries were placed on the cheese board and devoured in under 8 minutes, while the wine took up to a half hour to be opened. When people choose berry juice over hooch, you know you have a winner.

I’ll end this like an Aesop fable: The moral of the story is, be careful not to cut back what might grow into a nourishing and vibrant gift. Just remember to watch out for snakes at your feet.

One Response to The Elusive Berry

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi Ashley,
    I have been enjoying your blog. Thought I’d let you know the crabapples are ripe. Have your canning materials ready? Let me know when you’d like to come picking!!
    Love, Jan