books

QUENCH

 

HANDMADE GATHERINGS

 

A YEAR OF PIES!

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: HOME DAIRY

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: KEEPING BEES

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: CANNING & PRESERVING

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: KEEPING CHICKENS


Instagram
  • Many times a day, I snuggle up to this sweet boy and ask
  • I can see for miles and miles and miles. || Hope your Sunday is full of lovely views and relaxation!
  • Excellent cloud day today in the mountains of NC!
  • He's all about that tree. And so am I. ???
  • My friends write books, too! New post up over on small measure about four cookbooks recently published by friends of mine (tap the screen for tags of authors, photographers, and affiliates). These are mighty tasty reads, friends!!!
  • What you call pancakes, I call research and development. Work today included creating, and then inhaling with abandon, these Buttermilk Cornmeal Pancakes (served alongside sorghum-maple syrup). #wwllt #pancakes #f52grams #food52grams #southernfood #comfortfood
  • #tbt to what might possibly be my favorite photo of Huxley ever. This was from 1 1/2 years ago, when @glennbenglish posed our little honey bear (then 3 years old) with a bit of honey from our hives.
  • The fact that this vista can be accessed simply by walking out our back door, heading into the woods surrounding our home, and heading to the top of a mountain range is something I don't take for granted. The underlying reason for all of the work I do is to inspire myself and others to better steward this verdant planet. That's my drive, my cause, my mission, my mantra.
  • The long and winding road, that leads to my door. || So much green and blue in the cove today!
  • There was a time I used to say we should rename our property
  • Our house, in the middle of the woods.
  • The fried bologna sandwich, elevated. This version, which @glennbenglish and I made for yesterday's picnic, had fried beef bologna, Mahon cheese, pickled okra, and a homemade/home-foraged ramp aioli on grilled sourdough. There was also pixie dust (Kidding! Maybe....?).
my sponsors
Lucky-Design-7
budha hill natural toysImagine Childhood
Imagine ChildhoodBlissful Belly
Sponsorship Information
blog archive
  • 2015
  • 2014
  • 2013
  • 2012
  • 2011
  • 2010
  • 2009
  • 2008

Talkin’ Trash

Out here in the country, we don’t have regular curbside trash service. Well, let me clarify that. There is a trash service, but you have to pay for it. Since we live one mile down a dirt road, by the time we haul our garbage and recycleables into the back of the Outback and down to the curb we figured we might as well just keep driving, skip the removal fee,  and take them to what’s known as the “transfer station”, where debris of various sorts is taken, sorted, and then eventually hauled off to the landfill or recycling facilities.

Hubs created the recycling holding station pictured above for keeping our items out of the house (our pantry was getting some kind of crazy crowded with all manner of recyclables). Since almost every forest-dwelling predator imaginable shares the cove with us out here, he put a handled plank of wood on top to credit a barrier and deter easy access from marauding visitors of the four-footed persuasion. The gravel beneath each bin serves two purposes: it creates a weed barrier and it provides drainage to prevent water from pooling beneath the bins.

It’s awesome. Over the course of a few days, I squirrel away recyclable this’s and that’s in a canvas tote in the pantry. When it’s full, I schlep it outdoors and place items in separate bins for glass, metal, plastic, paper, and cardboard (which I jointly share with #5 recyclable items, accepted at our local Whole Foods).

As an order-seeking person, this appeals to me on so many levels. Things are tidy inside, and orderly outside, interluding in a sort of recycling purgatory until we fire up the Subaru and make our pilgrimage to the Transfer Station. I keep my sanity in check and my house orderly while our recyclables get a second lease on life. Win, win.

5 Responses to Talkin’ Trash

  • Brillant, simple, and actually a *nice looking* trash station! I can't stand having stuff in the house, either. This looks like an excellent compromise.

    Sarah M

  • Elizabeth says:

    I have the same issue, living in a rural area as well. Thankfully, the dump is only about a mile up the road, but they accept very limited recyclables. I've been trying to come up with a good outdoor storage solution too, though the area of back porch is all of like 3×12!

  • mandi says:

    Great idea! We are in a new home and I have been brain storming ways to keep the recyclables from taking over the house!

    Also- completely off subject- but i'm looking into investing in my first pressure cooker. I was looking at the Presto models 23 quart or 16 quart. Trying to decide if the 23 quart would be too big for daily cooking. Any experience with pressure cookers? any insight would be so appreciated!

  • mandi-that really depends on how much you intend to can at one time. i've got an all-american 15 quart pressure canner and i've never felt the need for a larger size, even when making big batches. if you're feeding a large family, or all of the farm hands (should you have them), then get the larger size. otherwise, the smaller model should do the job just fine.

  • oklyous says:

    Really cool and practical:)
    I live in the city and I am soo disapointed about how it is not possible for us to sort our waste. I would love to do it, but sadly have no possibility of doing it.