books

QUENCH

 

HANDMADE GATHERINGS

 

A YEAR OF PIES!

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: HOME DAIRY

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: KEEPING BEES

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: CANNING & PRESERVING

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: KEEPING CHICKENS


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  • When I say that you really need this Rhubarb Buttermilk Bread in your life, I wholeheartedly mean it. Find the recipe today over on small measure (link is in my profile).
  • It's not everyday that I get to picnic amongst pink ladyslipper orchids, smack dab in the middle of the forest, surrounded by delicious foods, and in the company of woman equally passionate about food, gardening, and the natural world. No, that day happens but once a year, when I am beyond honored to be invited to Barbara Swell's annual Ladies Ladyslipper Boozy Picnic. Libations were sipped, delicacies were consumed, the lady slippers were honored, travel and love stories were recalled, and there might have even been a wild turkey call or two made (raising hand-and Mr. Turkey even replied to two of my calls!!!). Today was a mighty fine day. || Brought my Buttermilk Rhubarb Bread to the picnic, pictured in the bottom of the photo (recipe is in
  • Such a wealth of skilled and talented bakers can be found in this area. Shown here are three goodies my friend @oldworldlevain had available this weekend at the Asheville Artisan Bread Festival. I bought all of them, along with a loaf of her Raisin & Flax bread, and treats from @chickenbridgebakery and Flat Rock Bakery. So much deliciousness!
  • Excited to see my first
  • What I love about ephemerals is that they force you to be fully present, fully engaged. What is blooming or on display today could be gone tomorrow. Ephemerals remind me to pay attention, to live more attentively and lovingly, every single day. || The exquisite blooming wisteria pergola, at its peek right now @biltmoreestate.
  • Sittin' in the mornin' sun, I'll be sittin' when the evening come. || Absolutely glorious day @biltmoreestate!
  • Views for days. @biltmoreestate
  • Currently, in our kitchen. || Wishing you and yours a cozy, comfy weekend.
  • Happy Friday from me and my mini me (image from spring 2014, taken by @timrobisonjr). || New
  • Green eggs & ham and buttermilk biscuits for work/lunch at home today. Made a ramp & wild garlic scape pesto with ramps from our patch and scapes from the property, then whisked it into scrambled eggs, as well as drizzled it atop. Going to miss those ephemerals when their time passes soon!
  • Taking it back to October 21st, 2011 for today's #tbt, when we celebrated our little guy's first birthday up at Sky Top Orchard. in Flat Rock, NC. We used to say his cheeks were made of jam in those days as they were so doughy and smooshy that they looked like jam-filled doughnuts.
  • Happy to call Hominy Valley home.

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What I’m Digging

DaffodilHelleboresHuxley Muscles
Happy Friday, friends! How are you? I’m up to my eyeballs in tax paperwork. Being self employed is no joke, come tax time. My calculator and I are becoming good friends. Best friends. BFF’s.

It’s been ages since I last did a round-up, so I figured no time like the present to get back in the saddle. These days it’s all about blooms and my buddy (showing me his “muscles” and his hair that I kept meaning to get cut and that has somehow, of its own accord, now morphed into a pretty amazing rendition of the hairdo Matt Damon deftly sported in Behind The Candelabra, yes? YES!). Those flowers and this face are all I need to get me out of the winter doldrums and back into my groove.

Here’s a smattering of this and that’s that have caught my attention recently:

*I am completely captivated with this blog. Scottish herbalist now living in L.A. that makes monthly special apothecary boxes like her March box about the sea. I. Know.

*If you use social media at all, you should read this post.

*These easy DIY flower print paintings would be a great way to brighten up a rainy spring day.

*Glenn and I are going to our first Blind Pig dinner tomorrow night. Blind Pig is a local underground supper club. Tomorrow night’s event is a tribute to Edna Lewis, pretty much the Grande Dame of southern cooking. We are over the moon excited!

*Not just for your morning cuppa: 15 household uses for coffee grounds.

*Turmeric is packed with anti-inflammatory properties, among other things. Try it in this chai!

*Hoping to score some fresh-off-the-tree Meyer lemons when we head to Florida next week. Would love to use them in this Meyer Lemon Ginger Concentrate for homemade sodas.

*Speaking of lemons, preserved lemons! (thanks to Molly for the link in her “She Knows” post).

*Really loving this moon phases necklace I purchased recently from Agate & Elm.

*Discovered N.C.-made Cackalacky beer a month or so ago. I’m not typically a canned beer fan, but this one has me in its clutches. I mean, it has ginger in it, so, as a equal-opportunity-ginger-lover, I pretty much have to like it.

 

It’s going to be close to 60 degrees here tomorrow. I almost don’t want to write that, as I know that a good deal of the country is still plowing thru winter weather. Hang in there!

Wherever you go this weekend, whatever you do, and whomever you do it with, may it be grand!

It’s All You, Anyways

Woods photoInto the woods, behind our home. 

My freshman year of college, I took an Existentialism 101 class. I’d read a bit of Camus and Sartre in high school and wanted to explore the topic more in depth. What resulted was a bit of a week-long existential crisis of the soul. When you’re 18, you’re so vulnerable and open to suggestion anyways, and taking a class that challenged and questioned the very nature of existence and meaning itself cut a deep divot thru my skull. I was being confronted with ways of thinking I’d never before encountered, that suggested that we were at the helm of our realities, guiding our own fates and determining and plotting the course of our lives, not puppets being moved to and fro by outside forces.

While I reconciled my own leanings towards the notion of a higher life form having created us with the concept of our emerging from the void without meaning written into any actions, I found solace in a quote I discovered in another course, a required humanities class. Walt Whitman, in Song of Myself, wrote “Do I contradict myself? Very well then, I contradict myself. I am large, I contain multitudes.” What I ended up with, when I combined what I’d learned at such a tender age, was the idea that identity is fluid. Contradiction is built into the nature of reality.

Around the same time, I also encountered another quote that would stick with me, this one from Heraclitus. “No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same man.” Life, and identity, and who you are, or who you might think yourself to be, are constantly in motion. Fixed notions of who we perceive ourselves or others to be are illusions, just like the notion that winter is a time of stillness and quietude. Underneath the surface, if you push back the mulch, there is so, so very much going on.

So what do existentialism and Whitman and Heraclitus have to do with homesteading and my life in the mountains of western North Carolina? A great deal. For as long as I can recall, I have loved winter. Pined for it in summer, thrilled at its arrival when the leaves turned color and cascaded down in late autumn. I’ve told everyone that will listen how much I love cozying up with blankets and mugs of hot tea indoors, tending to the wood stove as I pad about in wool sweaters and fuzzy slippers. What I realized a few weeks ago is that, while true, there’s also a part of me that suffers in winter. I go deep, turn into a bit of a recluse, and hide inside my heart, my mind, and often times, my home.

That’s what I’ve been doing these past few months. Creatively, this has served me well. I find my largest rushes of creativity when the weather is cool and cold. Mentally, though, it’s not the best. I struggle. I feel the winter blues a bit, especially if I don’t spend time outside and get a nice dose of Vitamin D, courtesy of the sun, to elevate my mood. I sequester. It’s always good, until it’s not. Lately, I can feel both the tug of my heart and mind to contradict myself, to say, “You know what? I don’t know that I really do enjoy winter anymore, for now.” The two thoughts are not mutually exclusive-they’re sides of myself at different times. Life is moving, and so am I.

Later today I’m going to collect soil samples in the garden with my friend (and neighbor!) Natalie. We’ll send them off to the local extension office for testing, to see what the nutrient profiles are of all 14 raised beds, and amend the soil accordingly. Tomorrow, it’s going to be in the upper 60′s. Next week, we three Englishes are taking off for a long overdue visit with family in Florida. I need these things to happen just like I needed winter to greet me with open arms back in December.

You never step into the same river because you’re never the same person each time. The river is never composed of exactly the same water. Go ahead, contradict yourself. It’s all you, anyways.

Love That Bag Dryer (+ Giveaway!!!)

Bag Dryer IRL 3Bag DryerBag Dryer 2
If you know me personally, then you can attest firsthand to my abhorrence of waste. I am a trash vigilante. From recycling toilet paper inserts, to sorting and recycling the plastic attachment and paper tag on new garments, to upcycling ribbon from gifts, I go to great lengths to keep things out of the waste stream.

Which is why Elana Kann’s “Love This Bag Dryer” is so amazing. Long time readers may recall my initial post about this item (formerly known as Branching Out Woodworks). I’ve been using the dryer for over 3 years now, and can attest to its durability, its unobtrusiveness, and its efficacy. In short, it holds up well, it doesn’t get in the way, and it really works. I am constantly drying bags out on it. I painted my bag dryer dark brown, to match the trim color on my moulding, but it doesn’t need it to work.

Made locally by Elana, a woodworker and artist, the dryers have a spruce base and birch dowels. There are two models to choose from, either countertop (shown in the second photo) or wall-mounted (shown in my house and in the third photo). They come in kits, easily assembled in about 5 minutes. Best of all, Elana has offered to give away a model of their choice (countertop or wall-mounted) to one small measure reader!

To enter, simply leave a comment below. You can write “Pick me!” or perhaps detail something specific that you’re doing to reduce waste and curb pollution. I’m ALWAYS on the hunt for additional ways to put the kibosh on waste. I’ll run the giveaway for one week, concluding next Monday, February 2nd, midnight EST. Open to those in North America only (sorry international buddies! That shouldn’t stop you from ordering, though!).

Even if you’re not the winner, now would be a wonderful time to purchase one of those bag dryers for yourself or a loved one, as local non-profit RiverLink and LoveThisBagDryer! are teaming up to keep plastic bags out of the French Broad River in Western North Carolina (which has the distinction of being the third oldest river in the world-it’s true!). To raise funds for its river cleanup, 14% of all sales of LoveThisBagDryer! through Valentine’s Day, February 14th,  will be donated to Riverlink for its annual springtime Clean Streams Day. The goal is to raise at least $400 for this purpose. Let’s help them reach that goal!

UPDATE: The giveaway is now closed. Thank you so, so very much to all that entered! Congratulations to our winner, Tess Church, randomly selected. Please keep in mind that there’s just over a week left to support the LoveThisBagDryer and River Link joint initiative. For every bag dryer sold, 14% of the profits will go towards the annual French Broad River Clean Streams Day this spring. So, hop on over and purchase one now, if you’re so inclined!

 

Pure Green Podcast

Pure Green Podcast
Friends, it’s already 2015! And the holidays have passed! And I feel like I’m finally coming up for air, just in time for an arctic blast to take my breath away. What about you? How are you feeling? Have things been wild and wacky and wonderful for you, too? I look forward to the stretch of days from Halloween to New Year’s Day all year. I’m overcome with emotion and activity when they’re upon me, reveling in their frenzy. And then, as though right on cue, I’m completely ready for them to subside and move on out and make way for something more still, more internal, more intimate as January appears on the calendar.

I have big plans for 2015. More books, more videos, more freelancing, more homesteading adventures, more kids (Maybe! Nothing cooking in that department just yet!). All kinds of new adventures. I’ve begun lately to think of life as more of an ever evolving, never finished endeavor than anything that can fully be managed or contained. The latter mindset just leaves me feeling like I can’t get all of the things I want to get done completed, which then spirals into guilt and frustration and self-doubt.

The thing I’m discovering is that it’s just fine for projects to always be “in process.” It’s as it should be, really. Life expands and contracts. It ebbs and flows. It’s always kinetic. You can’t get a handle on it, because it’s wild and fluid. But if you step into the current, and accept that you’re along for the ride, it’s much easier than trying to swim upstream. So, here’s to more coasting along and enjoying what comes and less worrying if my pantry is organized (it never, ever lets me get a handle on it, really), or if my upstairs craft/guest room/office is just so. Que sera. Whatever will be, will be!

In other news, I had so much fun chatting with Celine MacKay of Pure Green Magazine recently. We talked about homesteading and writing and community and so much more. You can check out the podcast here and learn more about Pure Green here. Thank you for having me, Celine!

Alright, if I’m going to make all of these big dreams for 2015 happen, I’d better get on it. After finishing up the picnic book, I took a bit of time to teach and entertain and host and decorate and enjoy the holidays. Now that they’re over, it’s back to work.

Sincerest wishes for a happy, healthy, love-filled 2015, from our home to yours.

A Holiday Toast, with Wassail

Happy Christmas Eve, friends! Can you believe it’s already here?! I know one little 4 year-old that’s enormously excited about what will occur this evening. So much so, in fact, that we presently have zero presents under the tree. He just can’t handle the waiting. I get it. All that wrapped up temptation. Better to just hold out and see nothing. But, man, I can’t wait to see his face in the morning! It’s entirely likely that I’ll cry, because I’m a complete and total sponge when it comes to other people’s emotional states.

What I want to share with you, though, before you, like me, move on with your merriment and gift-wrapping and fellowship and conviviality, is a little bit of holiday cheer. Our dear friends Rich and Jen Orris are golden. They have supported my career and been such solid, trusted friends and confidants since we met nearly 4 years ago. Not only do we share interests and pursuits and seriously goofy senses of humor, we’re now working on a project together.

With their ace help, Jen and Rich via their cheekily-titled business “What the Farm” created the first of what we aspire to be monthly “Small Measure” videos. Each will introduce a simple DIY project to do at home, based around food or crafting or homemaking/homesteading. Since it’s the holidays, a time when libations and laughter abound, our debut video is about making wassail.

The recipe comes from my book Quench, and was graciously provided by local Folklore expert Byron Ballard. I’m offering the recipe here for you, for creating your own holiday cheer this season. Thank you to Byron for the recipe, and massive thanks to Rich and Jen for, well, just being their wonderful selves (not to mention allowing me to use their home and property for the shoot!). From our home to yours, sincerest wishes for the happiest of holidays!

 

Wassail (excerpted from Quench: Handcrafted Beverages to Satisfy Every Taste & Occasion, Roost Books, 2014). 
At once a wish for good health, a hot beverage, and a traditional British ceremony that blesses apple trees for a fruitful harvest the following year, wassail covers many bases. This recipe comes from Byron Ballard, a writer, scholar, and expert on nature-based traditions and folklore. Don’t forget to wassail your trees, per her suggestion, by offering them the very first cup!
Makes: 10-11 cups.

You Will Need
-½ gallon fresh apple cider
-1 cup orange juice
-1 cup unsweetened cranberry juice
-½ cup honey
-6-8 cinnamon sticks
-Whole cloves (a handful)
-Several chunks of fresh ginger
-Rum, to taste

To Make
Combine all of the ingredients except for the rum in a deep pot or Dutch oven. Whisk gently to combine.

Simmer the mixture over the lowest setting at least 3 hours, stirring periodically.

When you feel the flavors have all come together to your liking, remove the pot from the heat. If desired, stir in rum in an amount to your inclination and taste preference.