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HOMEMADE LIVING: HOME DAIRY

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: KEEPING BEES

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: CANNING & PRESERVING

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: KEEPING CHICKENS


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Dairy Dabbling in the WSJ

 The Wall Street Journal has a post up today on making dairy products at home. Myself and my buddies A.J. and Claudia were all mentioned in it. I’ve put a partial excerpt of the article below (to read the entire piece, you’ll need a subscription).

The Latest DIY Craze? Say Cheese (And Other Dairy)
By ALINA DIZIK
A.J. Simone, a 23-year-old account executive at a furniture chain, had tried pickling, canning and bread-making. The next frontier for him: making cheese. “The first time I pressed cheese into a pre-formed mold, it was really satisfying,” says Mr. Simone, of Queens, N.Y. He now makes ricotta and dabbles in South Asian paneer.  

Ashley English, author of “Home Dairy,” a cookbook published last year, believes one reason for the enthusiasm for dairy- making is that it doesn’t require expensive contraptions or hours of time. Most of her recipes—for buttermilk, mascarpone, crème fraîche (a thin sour cream) and quark (a soft fresh cheese)—take less than an hour to prepare. Fresh mozzarella can take as little as 30 minutes. “When people see that you can get a carton of heavy whipping cream and get butter in five minutes, they
are in a profound state of awe,” she says.

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