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QUENCH

 

HANDMADE GATHERINGS

 

A YEAR OF PIES!

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: HOME DAIRY

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: KEEPING BEES

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: CANNING & PRESERVING

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: KEEPING CHICKENS


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  • At long last, Huxley finally found a dancing partner last night downtown in Asheville.
  • Perfect Saturday for this transcendent hot chocolate, made from scratch with @frenchbroadchocolates bars, sweetened with handcrafted sorghum syrup, and garnished with a dollop of homemade apple butter, graham cracker chards, slivered almonds, apple slices, cinnamon, and fresh ground nutmeg. Bring it, cold weather!
  • Had fun chatting about beverages from
  • It's hot toddy time! Tonight's incarnation includes: Douglas fir needle tea from @juniperridge, @defiantwhisky (cheers to NC-created booze!), honey from our bees, lemon peel and juice, and freshly grated nutmeg. Stay warm, friends, and happy weekend!
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Catching a Buzz

Lately, it’s all about the bees. I put honey in my tea and local bee pollen on my morning yogurt. In fact, I put honey AND pollen on my morning yogurt. I buy plain, organic, whole milk yogurt, scoop about 1/2 c.  in a bowl, drizzle it with honey, and sprinkle about 1 Tbsp. of bee pollen on top of it. Since I’ve been doing this, I have succumbed to neither a head cold nor seasonal allergies. And, yes, I’m knocking on wood as I write this. Give it a go yourself. Find some local honey or pollen, consume it regularly, and note your response. You’ll be supporting bee keepers, helping bee communities to thrive, and heaping nutrients into your body all at the same time. 

I also took an introduction to bee-keeping class just over a week ago. I’ll begin bee-keeping school in early February and hope to have a hive by this spring. The thought of being a keeper of bees enthralls me beyond description.
I’ve also been enjoying bee-related decor lately. This beehive cake pan was a gift I gave my friend Sharon for her birthday. As “Little Bee” is her nickname, it seemed appropriate. I’ve also enjoyed the jewelry of this designer. Her hive-motif pendants capture the innate magic and mystery inherent in the honeycomb. Perhaps some of you local folks would be interested in bee school as well? There’s potential for pleasure, pain, and profit! 

3 Responses to Catching a Buzz

  • nicole says:

    i’m so excited about your beekeeping class and look forward to seeing more posts about it here. my dad was a beekeeper for years, so i have many fond memories watching him wearing his full getup in our backyard, inhaling the smell of honeycomb in our basement, and savoring the site of jars and jars of rich, amber honey lined up on the kitchen counter.

    i’ve never actually eaten bee pollen. what does it taste like? and what’s the consistency like? what else is it good for, oh, creative culinary one?

  • hi nicole! bee pollen has a pretty unique taste, mildly sweet, earthy, kind of nutty. it’s a bit chalky, as far as texture goes, but because the individual granules are small, you aren’t getting a big chalky mouthfeel all at once.
    i’ve never heard of bee pollen being heated for culinary purposes, as i think doing so may compromise the enzymatic and nutritional benefits. that said, though, it’s great for sprinkling on pretty much anything-yogurt, oatmeal, cereal, toast, salad, sweet potatoes. you get the point. it’s imminently versatile. i try to use it at the same meal everyday as i’m more likely to remember things i incorporate into a routine.
    bee well!!

  • 17 beats. says:

    apiculture is so rewarding. i am very excited for you! i so miss the smells and sounds of beekeeping… have fun!