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HANDMADE GATHERINGS

 

A YEAR OF PIES!

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: HOME DAIRY

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: KEEPING BEES

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: CANNING & PRESERVING

 

HOMEMADE LIVING: KEEPING CHICKENS


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Book Review: Imagine Childhood

There are some books that come along that are so inspiring, so full of insight  they need to be shared with the world. Such is the case with Sarah Olmstead’s Imagine Childhood: 25 Projects That Spark Curiosity and Adventure.

I remember, before becoming a parent, how some of my friends that already had children would tell me that oftentimes, the box or packaging a gift came in ran in heavy competition in terms of interest and intrigue with the gift it contained. Once I had Huxley, I discovered they were completely right. Sometimes a scrap of paper becomes a train, or a stick found outside becomes a weed eater, or a box becomes a castle when he’s playing. Children have limitless potential when it comes to play and imagination, especially when engaging with the natural world, and that’s exactly what Imagine Childhood addresses.

Sarah wrote me a while back, asking if I’d like to be included in her book’s blog tour. I was familiar with her lovely shop and blog, and immediately, enthusiastically said “YES!” I’m happy to be today’s tour stop, and so enthused that I get to share her wonderful book with you. Although Huxley is still a bit on the wee side for some of the projects, they are ALL definitely on my agenda for the future. One of the projects will work for him right now, though, and I asked Sarah if I could share it with you all here today, to which she graciously agreed.

Below are images and text from Imagine Childhood for Sarah’s game of Lawn Bowling. So much fun! I’d love you to check out her book yourself. It’s full of lovely images, accessible projects, and oodles of starting points for unlocking a world of creative play with the littles in your life. Let the wild rompus start!

Lawn Bowling

A variation on traditional lawn bowling, in this game, you can either roll the striped stick at the pins or toss it toward them. These two options, in conjunction with color-coded pins, allow for many different games using the same seven sticks. 

Materials:
*7 small sticks or logs, 2″-3″ in diameter, cut to 6″-7″ long
*Paint
*Jojoba oil or beeswax

Making the Game:
1) Take six or seven sticks or logs (leaving the straightest and roundest aside) and paint one end of each with a color; these are the pins. I chose to make two pins of each color, but you can paint them each a different color or paint half of them and leave half natural.
2) For the last pin, paint each end the same color and then paint at least one stripe around the middle to indicate it as the tossing pin.
3) Once the pins are painted, you can seal them with jojoba oil or a natural beeswax to protect the paint.
4) To play arrange the pins so they are standing together in a group. Walk a short distance away and determine your throwing line.
5) From there, toss or roll the tossing pins to knock down as many pins as you can. See below for more suggestions.

Activity Suggestions:
*When using the log pins, you can simply play a traditional blowing game in which each pin is worth a point, or you might assign different point values to each color. These points could be obtained either by rolling or tossing the striped stick.
*Additionally, you might make the game a bit more difficult and try to knock down only one color, with each person or team having a specific color (like bowling and billiards combined). If you enjoy the smaller set, make more pins to make the game more complex.

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